Dark MaTTER

This is where David Dark goes for it in a tumblr kind of way.

We live in an era stocked with grim adult dramas whose themes boil down, in the end, to abstractions about good and evil, darkness and light. For all its daffy, dirty ways, “Orange Is the New Black” is more strongly rooted in the real world. Like “The Wire,” it intends to illuminate injustice by using stories so bright that you can’t ignore them.

By popular demand

dailyasterisk:

The world is being destroyed, no doubt about it, by the greed of the rich and powerful. It is also being destroyed by popular demand. There are not enough rich and powerful people to consume the whole world; for that, the rich and powerful need the help of countless ordinary people. We acquiesce…

But we’ve found ourselves in a cultural climate that appears increasingly unlikely to promote the skills required to think coherently about ourselves or how properly to converse with each other. The trouble with a sound-bite culture that resents complexity and lacks the patience to listen to (or read) any account of people, places, or events that doesn’t somehow prove we’re in the right is that it eventually becomes a sort of feedback loop playing over in our heads even when we aren’t tuned in to the television, radio, or computer screen. Our minds become populated with the slogans, short answers, talking points, and clichés that made us feel strong and in control when we heard them, and we only like to hear them reaffirmed

Lethal Injection: Beheading by Another Name

etr-gu:

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In his column for First Things, the late Rev. Richard John Neuhaus used to relish pointing out articles that contradicted each other in the same day’s New York Times – evidence, in his highly rhetorical presentation, that the Gray Lady’s left hand didn’t know what her right hand was doing.

Myself, I relish finding pieces in the

(via lacockrel)

locusimperium:

Anthony Towne, William Stringfellow’s long-term companion, was hilarious.

violentcharity:

One of my favorite finds from the William Stringfellow Papers at Cornell. I’m not sure who created it; I think Stringfellow received it in the aftermath of the Plowshares Eight actions, along with some letters and newsletters of those involved.

violentcharity:

One of my favorite finds from the William Stringfellow Papers at Cornell. I’m not sure who created it; I think Stringfellow received it in the aftermath of the Plowshares Eight actions, along with some letters and newsletters of those involved.

(via locusimperium)

theparisreview:

“Do you know why teachers use me? Because I speak in tongues. I write metaphors. Every one of my stories is a metaphor you can remember. The great religions are all metaphor. We appreciate things like Daniel and the lion’s den, and the Tower of Babel. People remember these metaphors because they are so vivid you can’t get free of them and that’s what kids like in school. They read about rocket ships and encounters in space, tales of dinosaurs. All my life I’ve been running through the fields and picking up bright objects. I turn one over and say, Yeah, there’s a story.” —Ray Bradbury, born on this day in 1920

theparisreview:

“Do you know why teachers use me? Because I speak in tongues. I write metaphors. Every one of my stories is a metaphor you can remember. The great religions are all metaphor. We appreciate things like Daniel and the lion’s den, and the Tower of Babel. People remember these metaphors because they are so vivid you can’t get free of them and that’s what kids like in school. They read about rocket ships and encounters in space, tales of dinosaurs. All my life I’ve been running through the fields and picking up bright objects. I turn one over and say, Yeah, there’s a story.” —Ray Bradbury, born on this day in 1920

(via jumpseatmonalisa)