Dark MaTTER

This is where David Dark goes for it in a tumblr kind of way.
locusimperium:

lukexvx:

Here you go locusimperium

So this is the question that Luke originally asked me:

Been wanting to ask this for a while. What do you think of Stringfellow’s tapestry passage in Imposters of God A Private and Public Faith and how that might apply to high church ecclesiology of heavily budgeted architecture/cathedrals/aesthetics? I know it’s basically a justice vs liturgy question of priority (should the emphasis be more missions or rather liturgical formation), but what do you think?

I think you’re establishing a dichotomy that isn’t present in this passage. As Beck notes, Stringfellow’s emphasis here is on freedom, which is a consistent theme throughout his work — that is, the Gospel is a message of freedom from death (/powers/principalities/idolatries) that is also remarkably non-prescriptive. Stringfellow is less concerned with what you do, and more concerned with the location from which you are acting — is it one of freedom in Christ to resist the demonic?
One doesn’t need to sell tapestries or forsake cathedrals. Tapestries and cathedrals can be forms of worshiping God. But the biblical person (a favorite phrase of Stringfellow’s) must not believe that to sell a tapestry or to vacate a cathedral would diminish the church.

locusimperium:

lukexvx:

Here you go locusimperium

So this is the question that Luke originally asked me:

Been wanting to ask this for a while. What do you think of Stringfellow’s tapestry passage in Imposters of God A Private and Public Faith and how that might apply to high church ecclesiology of heavily budgeted architecture/cathedrals/aesthetics? I know it’s basically a justice vs liturgy question of priority (should the emphasis be more missions or rather liturgical formation), but what do you think?

I think you’re establishing a dichotomy that isn’t present in this passage. As Beck notes, Stringfellow’s emphasis here is on freedom, which is a consistent theme throughout his work — that is, the Gospel is a message of freedom from death (/powers/principalities/idolatries) that is also remarkably non-prescriptive. Stringfellow is less concerned with what you do, and more concerned with the location from which you are acting — is it one of freedom in Christ to resist the demonic?

One doesn’t need to sell tapestries or forsake cathedrals. Tapestries and cathedrals can be forms of worshiping God. But the biblical person (a favorite phrase of Stringfellow’s) must not believe that to sell a tapestry or to vacate a cathedral would diminish the church.

June Reading

patchdrury:

Everyday Apocalypse: The Sacred Revealed in Radiohead, The Simpsons, and Other Pop Culture Icons - David Dark

image

In the eighties there was a rash of books put out by Christian publishing houses all about finding God in pop culture. The idea was that, occasionally, television shows, movies, and…

Ends in despair

dailyasterisk:

According to a bumper sticker, “Whoever dies with the most toys wins.” There are no gifts to be given because there is no giver. We end up only with whatever we manage to get for ourselves. This story ends in despair. It gives us a present tense of anxiety, fear, greed and brutality. It produces…

revawilliams:

So, Charles Wright became the U.S. poet laureate a couple of weeks ago. He really is one of my all-time faves. Here is a taste of some of his stellar and far-reaching work. This one is called “Future Tense.” I’ve probably made you read it before…All things in the end are bittersweet—An empty gaze, a little way-station just beyond silence.If you can’t delight in the everyday,                                                         you have no future here.And if you can, no future either.And time, black dog, will sniff you out,                                                             and lick your lean cheeks,And lie down beside you—warm, real close—and will not move.

revawilliams:

So, Charles Wright became the U.S. poet laureate a couple of weeks ago. He really is one of my all-time faves. Here is a taste of some of his stellar and far-reaching work. This one is called “Future Tense.” I’ve probably made you read it before…


All things in the end are bittersweet—
An empty gaze, a little way-station just beyond silence.

If you can’t delight in the everyday,
                                                         you have no future here.

And if you can, no future either.

And time, black dog, will sniff you out,
                                                            and lick your lean cheeks,
And lie down beside you—warm, real close—and will not move.

Write because you want to communicate with yourself. Write because you want to communicate with someone else. Write because life is weird and tragic and amazing. Write because talking is difficult. Write because it polishes the heart. Write because you can. Write because you can’t. Write because there is a blackbird outside of my window right now and oh my god isn’t that the best start to the day? Write because you’re trying to figure yourself out. Write because you might not ever figure yourself out. Write because there still aren’t enough love poems in the world.

—Dalton Day, interviewed for Banango Street (via bostonpoetryslam)

(via jaredslack)

Write because you want to communicate with yourself. Write because you want to communicate with someone else. Write because life is weird and tragic and amazing. Write because talking is difficult. Write because it polishes the heart. Write because you can. Write because you can’t. Write because there is a blackbird outside of my window right now and oh my god isn’t that the best start to the day? Write because you’re trying to figure yourself out. Write because you might not ever figure yourself out. Write because there still aren’t enough love poems in the world.

—Dalton Day, interviewed for Banango Street (via bostonpoetryslam)

(via jaredslack)